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Morgan Four Four

The 4-seater 4/4 Series I was easily recognisable, as it carried solely one spare wheel, upright, versus the two of the 2-seater and Drophead Coupé.

When the 4/4 first appeared, it had a tiny 4-cylinder 1122cc Coventry Climax under the bonnet. This was also fitted to the 4-seater version which appeared on the market a year later.
 
In 1938 the Drophead Coupé was introduced. This was an elegant touring car on the same chassis.
The main difference were the high doors and the elegant windscreen, with a small wooden panel on top which made it possible to close the hood easily and effectively. A few of these also were equipped with the Coventry Climax engine.
 
However, soon after the introduction of the Drophead Coupé, during 1939, Morgan changed over to the 1267 cc Standard Special engine, made especially for Morgan by the Standard Motor Company. Sir John Black, its owner, was a good friend of HFS Morgan.
 
The Standard Special engine was the only engine which received the Morgan script on the valve cover and therefor looked like a "Morgan engine".
 
Of course, Morgan proved the reliability of their 4/4 also by participating in different forms of competition.
 
Apart from the traditional trials, they fared well in road rallies like the RAC Rally, but also in races like the famous Tourist Trophy. In 1937 a Morgan 4/4 won on handicap.
 
The TT Replica had the single spare wheel on top of the rear panel, while on the Le Mans Replica it was semi-recessed. The red car actually is a TT Replica Replica.The late Ken Hill's 1946 Le Mans Replica. It appeared in numerous publications and is shown here in Cheltenham during the Centenary celebrations. T. Dixon Smith's +4 4-seater Drophead Coupé (Snob Mog) is parked next to it.
This formed the basis for a new model, inspired on the car which won the event, the TT Replica. It was immediately recognisable from the other pre-war 4/4s, as it had a sloping rear panel,  carrying a single spare wheel. Very few were built and it never actually appeared in a Morgan catalogue.
Enjoy the elegant lines of the Drophead Coupé. The side strips accentuate these. This post-war example again featured disc wheels.
The same goes for another limited production model, based on the car which fared well in the 1938 and 1939 Le Mans 24 Hour races, the Le Mans Replica.
 
Of the Le Mans Replica also an ultra-rare 4-seater version was built.

A luxury version of the 4/4, with high "suicide" doors, a neat hood and an elegant body, called the Drophead Coupé, was introduced in 1938.

A small number were built with the 1122cc Coventry Climax engine and "aluminium spoked disc wheels". The majority came equipped with the 1267cc Standard Special, however.

Few original examples still survive. The black one on the left has had one owner for numerous years and still is used regularly. The car has the original Standard Special engine under the bonnet.